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CHAKRA - 6th Chakra - Turtle  Third Eye

“God is not a God of disorder but of peace.” 1 Corinth 14:33

To have a winning team, it takes the willingness and cooperation of individuals working together in orderly strategies and the expression of their talents. Great concert halls fill with the results of musicians dedicated to the discipline of practice and harmony with all other instruments for the appreciation and inspiration of the audience.

Chemistry was a hard subject for me to learn in high school. I did not pursue many chemistry classes in college. But in biology and later in the study of nutrition, I was fascinated by all the intricate parts of our body digestive and other systems to make our physical body one of order.

By the 1990s, medical physicians and health care professionals were speaking and writing openly of “life-style” diseases such as heart disease, diabetes type 2 and cancer. They meant that while we may have some predisposition to these diseases through genetics and heredity, they were also just as likely to have some seeds in the choices we made in life. By the new millennium of 2000, we were made pretty aware of the “dirorder poor lifestyle choices could lead to. Improved recovery and prevention rates kept increasing as we set about putting accountability and order in our lives.

Bloom where planted

But what can we say about the disorder and violence and displacements of people through weather tragedies hurricanes, floods, tornadoes or violent wind and snow storms? There again, throughout world history, each and every region has suffered wars and the atrocities of cruel and horrendous murderous actions and revengeful retaliations. When we view this or personally suffer the loss and destruction, the human spirit cries out to stop the disorder and injustices.

We posses God’s wholly sufficient Divine Presence within us at all times.. So we are not a people of disorder but instead, a people of peace. Peace is having faith in the order of all things and looking beyond the apparent disorder of world event, toxic relationships, insanity or financial devastation that corrupts and unsettles our lives. Looking beyond is not ignoring these things. It means very much that we are aware of them and we seek the solutions to them in a “peace that surpasses all understanding.”

Does this peace mean no pain? No. Does it mean the acceptance of suffering, physical or otherwise? Maybe Does it mean loss? On a human level, most likely. But to have peace constitutes having hope without answers at the present time, while we hold to a belief in our God as a God of order.

We can do this.  Peace Be.

backyard sunset

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dementia

 

Living Where Everything Is Forgotten: A Mother and Son’s Struggle Toward a “Dementia-Friendly America

Tuesday, June 7, 2016 at 8:48 a.m.

By Robrt L. Pela

 

GUEST BLOG

 

“My mother is washing dishes. She’s using a paper napkin she found in the kitchen sink, and a little bit of leftover coffee from a mug on the counter. She scrubs at bits of egg stuck to a fork, sets it next to the saucer she’s just cleaned. Then she grabs the saucer, wets the napkin with the coffee, and washes the saucer again.

 

“Hey, Duchess!” I call to her from across the kitchen. “What’re you doing?”

 

“I’m getting all the train books ready,” she replies, looking cross. “She said they were eight coming, the children.”

 

She moves to the refrigerator, and begins to gather food for the people she imagines are on their way to this house where she has lived for 50 years: a half-empty Tupperware of minestrone, a hard-boiled egg, the bowl of oatmeal she refused to eat this morning. (“It’s too spectator pump,” she had complained, pushing the bowl away.) She piles these things onto the kitchen table, then heads off to her room, probably to dress for her phantom company.

 

By the time she arrives there, my mother will have forgotten what she wanted. Her 10-year-old Alzheimer’s diagnosis was recently reclassified; she’s now a 6 on the Global Deterioration Scale, a means of measuring the depths of dementia that tops out at 7. The Duchess will arrive at her bedroom, become distracted by something — a lampshade, her framed wedding portrait, my dead father’s key ring — and dressing for imaginary company will be forgotten. These days, for Maria Domenica Clemente Pela, pretty much everything is forgotten.

 

I don’t follow her to her room. I’ve got a kitchen to clean and a stack of insurance papers to fill out before I take the Duchess to her quarterly oncology appointment later this afternoon. A decade ago, I took my time with things: finished a project only when it was perfectly complete; awoke when I was done sleeping. Today, I’ve learned to take shortcuts. There’s never enough time to do everything, or to do anything especially well.

 

I am what is politely referred to as a caregiver.

 

I spend most of my days and some of my nights here at the suburban West Phoenix house where I grew up in the ’60s and ’70s, where my 91-year-old mother and I have been playing a decade-long game ever since she began losing her mind to Alzheimer’s disease: She is the Duchess of Pela, and I am her minion. I awaken her, bathe her, dress her, and feed her, after which she sits in her kitchen, a gentle expression fixed on her face, reading and re-reading the story of her life, a 249-page, handwritten essay she composed a dozen years before she began forgetting who she was and where she lived. Several times a day, she looks up from her journal. “Have you read this?” she implores. “It’s good!”

 

In the afternoons, the Duchess is restless. Her journal no longer holds her interest; she refuses to play with her little box of paste jewels. She’s anxious to get home to the house in northeastern Ohio where she hasn’t lived since 1942, worried she won’t be able to find it on her own. She paces, maniacally tidying her kitchen, distracted by some puzzling chore she must complete but can’t quite fathom.

 

I’m distracted today, too. I’ve received a press release announcing that Tempe has joined the Dementia Friendly America initiative. Introduced last summer at the White House Conference on Aging, this yet-unfunded program means to create a “national dementia friendliness,” one city at a time, by training individuals, businesses, and first responders to recognize and respond appropriately to people with memory impairments. Thirty-six towns and cities in Minnesota, where DFA was launched last year, have adopted the initiative’s four-phase roadmap; in March, Tempe became only the sixth city outside Minnesota to join the dementia-friendly fray.

 

How’s that going to work? I wonder, as my mother ambles into the kitchen carrying three handbags and a toilet plunger, a wilted brassiere wrapped around her wrist. How is an entire city going to learn to deal with old folks who insist that Herbert Hoover is president, people who can’t tell a bra from a bracelet?

 

The very idea of a dementia-friendly world strikes me as preposterous. I can’t convince the respite care workers I sometimes hire, who are supposedly trained to deal with the memory-impaired, not to tell my mother that her husband died three years ago. She thinks she’s 9, and little girls don’t have husbands. It upsets her to hear otherwise. Some of the medical professionals who look after the Duchess, when told she has Alzheimer’s, speak more loudly, as if volume adds clarity — even though she’s not hearing-impaired. If I can’t get my mother’s own children and grandchildren to take part in her care, how can Tempe expect to sell sensitivity training to a reluctant universe of clerks and bankers and doctors?

 

“Is this yours?” my mother asks, holding out the toilet plunger.

 

“Yes,” I lie, taking it from her. “I’ve been looking for it everywhere.”

 

“Well,” says the Duchess, looking me up and down. “It doesn’t look like it’s going to fit.”

 

The statistics are bleak. According to last year’s annual report from Alzheimer’s Disease International, the number of people with dementia worldwide has grown to just shy of 47 million. That figure is expected to double by 2030, and to triple 20 years after that…. For now, one in nine seniors has some form of dementia. Arizona alone will see a 71 percent increase in the number of residents with dementia over the next 10 years.

 

….There are other hurdles to a dementia-friendly anything. According to that ADI report, about half of all dementia patients go undiagnosed, in part because most people figure there’s no point in being diagnosed when there’s no cure.

 

“We’ve got a long road ahead of us,” Jan Dougherty tells me when I call to ask about this Dementia Friendly thing “Right now, dementia is where cancer was in the ’60s or HIV was in the ’80s,” Dougherty explains. “People are really just starting to talk about this disease openly. There’s more education on the stupid Zika virus than there is on dementia. But we have to start somewhere.”

 

The program is designed, according to that press release, “to help communities better understand, embrace, and support residents living with dementia.”

 

Okay. But how? I watch an animated video on the DFA website in which ethnically diverse line drawings are made happier because everyone they meet knows how to interact with dementia patients. According to the cartoon, DFA will educate local businesspeople about how to support customers with dementia, convince employers to support employees who are caregivers, and teach law enforcement and city service providers how to deal with the demented. DFA is also proposing changes to transportation, public spaces, and emergency response that would allow people with dementia to interact in their community.

 

In some cities, “memory cafes,” where memory-impaired people can gather, have made it onto the must-have list. Businesses will all, according to this plan, one day post a logo on their doors.

 

“To ask priests and rabbis if they want to learn more about dementia?” I ask. “To request pro bono representation for Alzheimer’s patients?” I apologize to Mitchell for being slow on the uptake.

 

But even with the help of the little cartoon, I’m still struggling to grasp how Tempe will implement a program whose four phases include vague bullet points like “Form a community engagement sub-team” and “Develop an organized process flow and timeline,” and wraps up with “Create and implement a community action plan.”

 

“One person at a time,” Mayor Mitchell replies. “Fifteen hundred people in my community have dementia, and I need to get the city educated on how to help them.”

 

Okay. But would Mitchell have climbed aboard the dementia-friendly bus, I ask, if his own mother didn’t have Alzheimer’s?

 

“I don’t know,” he answers. “Would you be writing a newspaper article about it if your mother didn’t have that same disease?”

 

Touché, Mayor Mitchell.

 

The Duchess and I are seated in the waiting room of her new general practitioner’s office, waiting for the results of her annual tuberculosis test. She is stressed out about getting home late for supper and being grounded by her father, who died in 1958, and I am entertaining myself by counting the number of times she tells me she hasn’t any pancakes in her purse (17 times so far, and she’s not carrying a purse today).

 

The woman seated across from us smiles at me. “My mother had dementia, too,” she quietly confides. I return her smile and think to myself, Okay, I’m about to have this conversation again.

 

“I took care of her for two years before we had to put her in a home,” she is saying, and I’m thinking, Two years? Really? Two.

 

“How difficult that must have been for you,” I say. “And how does she like it there?”’

 

“Oh, she died three weeks later,” the woman replies, after which the Duchess and I excuse ourselves and move to the other side of the waiting room.

 

A little while later, we’re taken to an examination room by a nice medical assistant named Juanita, who talks baby-talk to my ancient mom.

 

“Will you get up on the scale so we can weigh you, please, Miss Mary?” Juanita asks with a big pout, her words all syrupy, rounded vowels. The Duchess shoots me a look that clearly says, Get this person away from me! and I look back at her with an expression that replies, Oh, right, you’re the parent I inherited my crummy attitude from!

 

“My mother has late-stage Alzheimer’s disease,” I explain to Juanita as I pantomime how to get on and off the scale. “Sometimes showing works better than telling.”

 

Juanita smiles at me and turns to the Duchess. “Have any of your medications changed since last time you were here, Miss Mary?” My mother begins a long, disjointed explanation of why she chose to wear this particular pantsuit, indicating the sundress I’d put on her that morning. Juanita turns to me.

 

“Is she always like this?”

 

“She has late-stage Alzheimer’s,” I remind her, handing over an updated list of medicines. My mother is still trying to tell her pantsuit story when the doctor joins us. Rather than talk to my mother as if she were a precocious toddler, he ignores her entirely, speaking only to me. It turns out Her Majesty does not have tuberculosis.

 

When we get home, I put the Duchess down for a nap and then I call Olivia Mastry, the executive lead for Dementia Friendly America. I want to ask her, “How come everyone gets to have a mother who dies except me?” I’d like to say, “How come health-care workers all call my mother Miss Mary, as if she were a plantation owner in antebellum Atlanta?” Instead, I ask how much importance DFA plans to place on training medical professionals to deal with demented people.

 

Plenty, she promises. “We have tools and resources that guide each sector of the community, and there’s a real emphasis on physicians and their staffs. It’s not all clergy members and clerks. We’re still defining what dementia-proficient means for medical workers, and once we do, everyone from doctors on down will be held to a standard.”

 

Really? Training the entire medical community seems like a pretty tall order. I call Dr. Pierre Tariot, my mother’s doctor at Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, and ask him if this seems doable to him.

 

“While Dr. Tariot and I are saying our goodbyes, the respite care worker arrives for her twice-weekly shift. “Hellooooooo Miss Mary!” I hear her cooing in a voice typically reserved for really cute puppies. “Remember me?”

 

Maybe, I think to myself, I’ll die in my sleep tonight and I won’t have to deal with any of this anymore.”

 

 

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Change 5

I am inspired to share Betty Lue Lieber’s 10 Keys to a Good Life from her Loving Reminders she posted today. Then I go to prepare “the best chicken noodle soup EVER”,( says my seven year old granddaughter) for her father, who got smacked with a fever and cold last night. His usual post is on the playground helping the school and the children, but he is taking care of himself with home rest today. All of this is part of THE GOOD LIFE.

From Betty Lue:

Affirmations:
I respect my needs and the needs of others.
I love, trust and respect myself.
The more I love, trust and respect myself, the more I love trust and respect others.
The more I love, trust and respect myself, the more others love, trust and respect me.

March 26, 2015 Loving Reminders- Basic Needs

What Do You Need?

What do our children need?
What do our families need?
What do our partners need?
What does our world need
?

When we are giving ourselves what we need, we will be happy, healthy and fulfilled.
Life can be simply fun, safe and easy when we honor our own needs and the needs of others.
What we “need” is totally different from our “wants”.
People are often taking care of what they want, but neglecting their basic needs.

It is time we return to basics.
It is time to learn to begin at the beginning.
It is time to listen to what is important.
It is time to honor ourselves and others.

Needs are not pleasures.
Needs are not whims.
Needs are not temporary happiness.
Needs are basic and primary to being and feeling safe, secure and strong.

We each need to be fed and sheltered and safe.
We each need to be educated and socialized.
We each need to be loved and to belong.
We each need to have something to do.

The priorities for children are not entertainment and toys.
The priorities in families are not chores and doing homework.
The priorities in partnerships are not partying and sexual intimacy.
When the media feeds us with what sells, we often forget and neglect the basics.

In a privileged and affluent nation, we have impoverished ourselves and our children.
When we work to provide temporary pleasures, spending time and money on nonessentials, we make ourselves poor in love, inspiration and healthy living.
We need Love, Love for ourselves, for others and for the beauty and bounty all around us.
We need gratitude for those we love and those who love us.
We need to know we are safe and secure, with a bed to sleep in and bills paid.
We need to eat regular meals prepared by someone who cares.
We need relationships that are respectful, reassuring and valuing who we are.

Good living comes from feeling grateful for the people in our lives and showing we love them.
Good living is taking care of our bodies, our clothing, our homes and what we have that serves us.
Good living is reading a book to our kids and tucking them in at night.
Good living is laughing at ourselves and enjoying the fun we have everyday.
Good living is breathing deep the fresh spring air and being grateful to be alive.
Good living is thanking Creator, Source, Universe for the unlimited life we have.
Good living is remembering Who We are and why we are here.
Good living is natural for those who see and trust in the Good that is theirs.

Let us remember to give ourselves and others the basics we need with full appreciation.
Life work when we take care of our needs.
Loving ourselves, Betty Lue

Ten Keys to a Good Life:

Be Responsible for the entirety of your life.
Be Open to learn from everything and everyone.
Be Forgiving of all mistakes, yours and others.
Be Truly helpful by thinking, speaking and giving your best.
Be Impeccable in caring for your body, relationships, home, work, finances.
Be Willing to live with moderation in all things.
Be Aware of the Gift of Love and the Call for Love.
Be Exact with your thoughts and words; they create your life.
Be Hard-working with wisdom, gratitude and joy.
Be Good.
See Good.
Think Good.
Speak Good.
Give Good.

From Napkinwriter:

I am living as Love in my life.

2015 Intention Mandala Living As Love

 

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Love Your Body

Do it! Love your body. It houses your soul.

“Clothe yourselves with love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony.”
Colossians 3:14

This was the scripture for today, Thursday, March 27, 2014 in my Unity Daily Word. The focus word is…..harmony.

And that instantly makes me think of my dear friend, Lauren Lane Powell. We have never met in person, but our spirits of harmony, respect, joy and suffering have been united for a long time.

Lauren Lane PowellLauren

Lauren lives the scripture passage in her life daily. A life that was almost lost to a most serious case of rare cancer during a struggle and test lasting more than two years.  She traveled, coped, took many big breaths of deep, deep courage, tasted the well of acceptance, letting go into whatever was to be.

And what was to be was………recovery and transformation. A treasured return to the love of her life….actually two loves of her life; her husband and her gift of singing, and more than singing. Healing through singing, and helping others do the same.

Getting back on the stage of both life and performance. Giving from her talents, her heart and the message that is hers to give.

Her message is one of HOPE AND HARMONY.

Lauren in Harmonies of Healing

Lauren Lane Powell

“I took myself on a interesting journey having arrived finally at perfect health, ” she states in her blog.

Lauren practices harmony, not only in her performances, but in her life. She lives, as she is called, not as she used to “pre-Canswer days”, but in respect for the new now of her life and her body and letting go of what used to be that is no longer needed.  Like a super-duper booked schedule of activities and demands. (Although her “light” schedule bodes fairly ambitious to the casual observer).

Let Go

Daily Word reminds us “In music, dissonance is resolved by moving to a consonant chord.” Even if we are not trained musicians, we can intimately be familiar with the feeling of discord  or lack of harmony in our own life.

Yet just as the musician can move her fingers to different keys on the piano to invoke the harmony needed, I can open my heart to God, surrender to the great presence of God within me and listen for inner guidance and direction.

Have I learned yet that as I let go of conflict, I find that every situation is a lesson in love?  With a mindful response and a willingness to do what is mine to do…forgive….let go…..or resolve …harmony is restored even if I now play in another key.  The highest good for all.

This takes effort…..gifts of grace…..and practice.  Ahh, practice. There is the key. It allows for mistakes and  “retakes”.   Much valued in my life.

Butterfly Simplify

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rainbow and little angel

Once upon a time, in the land of Kalamazoo, a small princess was born. She was a beautiful baby girl who had come to bring much joy and happiness into the lives of her mother and father, the Queen and King of the land of Kalamazoo.

This little princess’ name was Amy. The King and the Queen took very good of this baby and she grew to be a happy, happy child who truly believed in magic and knew she belonged in the kingdom of princesses.

Princess Amy especially loved her “Baby Bear” who was with her from the time she was born, until now more than six years later. She loved to play pretend and did a lot of this with her GrandQueen Grama.  They built castles together, played hide and seek together, walked on rainbows and climbed mountains together. They loved spending time together.  They often had tea together.

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Princess Amy was very often seen in sparkly dresses and play clothes. If it had sparkles on it, she loved it.

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And Princess Amy loves rainbows. She draws and colors them all the time. She even draws rainbow snowflakes.

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This is a picture of Amy and Grama walking under the rainbow and in the background, Dziadzia is watching us from behind the rainbow.

Then one day, she drew and cut out a rainbow snowflake, encouraging spring to come after this very long, cold winter.

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The very next day the sun shone brightly and melted some of the big piles of snow we have from the winter snowstorms.

Lately, almost every time Amy is playing with Grama, she mentions she is going to have her tonsils out in a short while. Now, with less than a week to go, she even counts down every day until next Monday when the operation is scheduled.

I mentioned to her Queen Mother that we could help Amy’s anxiety a little if she knew she had a special guardian angel looking over her at all times and they could talk about that leading up to the big day.  I told her I would draw her angel and bring it to her and that, of course, her special angel would be a rainbow angel with lots of sparkles on her.

A few nights later, I got a call from the Queen. She said that Amy needed her angel right now, since she knew I was going to find it for her.

With all the graces that angels bring to us, her angel flew right into me in an image I found on the computer.  I had taken a photo of Amy a week earlier as “the sleeping princess” awaiting her prince (me), who would kiss her and wake her up.

So the two pieces went together beautifully on a SoulCollage® card which I was working on at the very moment of the Queen’s phone call. The power and mystery of SoulCollage® works that way.  I finished it up and drove over to see the Princess.

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Princess Amy was thrilled to see her angel. She recognized her right away as her own angel that God sent to her. She said she sees the very sparkles that were on the card already in her room when it is dark.  “Sometimes I even feel a breeze in my hair and that must be the angel’s wings,” she said. “Look, even her hair and wings are rainbows.”

“I am going to keep this forever,” she told me. “I’m going to keep this until I grow up and then I can show my own little girl my guardian angel and tell her about hers.”

She clasped her to her heart and said she wasn’t going to be alone and not so afraid to go to sleep now that she knew all the company she would have: her mom and dad, her baby bear, God in her heart and “Sparkle Rainbow Diamond” guardian angel. She thought she should tell the doctor there was going to be an angel in the room.  And that God was in her heart and would tell the angel everything she needed and for the doctor to do everything right.

Her confidence and courage built by the moment, and my daily prayer is that all that good energy stays with her through her first major medical experience. The angel can do that.

And back in the land of Kalamazoo, we will have the popsicles and ice cream ready.

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Loving Reminders. That is what she calls them. I have paid attention to them since the late 1990s but she has been writing them much longer than that.

Betty Lue Lieber, an energetic, active, happy, funny spiritual leader and activist, and lover of people and all God’s creation, has a stack of professional credentials behind her but she doesn’t need them to live a life where she freely gives of her gifts. Bottom-line, she serves — life and its people, gladly, gleefully, generously and “of-Godly.

How’s that for alliteration!

It is the beginning of February and many people are now struggling with a self-image that is somewhat dented due to once-again failure to live up to their brand new resolutions for 2014. Self-judgment and the inner critic have tarnished the resplendent resolutions once again and makes them in the mood for “settlement”.  “Oh well, this is me,” they say.

The most common fired-up visions are those of losing weight, exercising more, getting organized, spending less money, saving more.  January is a good combustion month to get going on these paths, but soon the paths lead to distracting sideroads and the comfort of the familiar digressions.

I haven’t made any of those resolutions this year. But I have found a comfortable relationship with food that has prevented weight gain from a recent loss of nearly fifty pounds, and that feels good. My natural inclination is to organize in my environment and envision what I want my day and year to look like. So that too provides enough energy and “will” to create some change and order.

The money part is easy. There is little discretionary income to be had, so it is not there to spend or save. This last part I have the fullest, purest intention to allow to change. So I trust that it does.

The reason I am introducing you once again to Betty Lue is that this past week, when clearing paper work and files in my creativity room, I came across one of her Loving Reminder emails that I had printed out ( spontaneous, inspiring pieces are my biggest challenge to keep the paperwork down and save the trees).

She writes these daily from her long-time practice of quiet time, inner listening and writing down what she hears. She does this daily as a guiding practice to which she remains faithful. They most often are “spot-on” for me. This one was written on July 13, 2002.  I have incorporated it into my daily morning prayer practice and it, indeed, is a great loving reminder for how I want my life to look.

The effort to embody these “ways of being” are what I see as a great alternative to making New Year’s Resolutions. With them, we can adapt the St. Benedict’s attitude of “Each day, a new beginning.”

From Betty Lue: July 13, 2002

“What if I really place my future in the hands of God?
What if I really trust that I will be provided for perfectly?
What if I really live in faith, knowing that lal things work together for good?
Few have done it, but those who do share powerful messages of Peace and Joy.

If I place my future in the hands of God:
I will not worry about the future.
I will never be afraid.
I will live in the moment.
I will enjoy what life brings.
I will stop efforting.
I will slow down.
I will not feel pressure.
I will trust all is well.
I will stop trying to control.
I will spend my time on important things.
I will do what really matters to me.
I will sing and dance through life.  (She does)
I will listen to my heart.
I will quit meaningless activities.
I will stop protecting myself.
I will focus on being happy.
I will let go of what I don’t value.
I will feel free.
I would live as a child.
I will play and create goodness.
I will let go of seriousness.
I will breathe fully and freely.
I will know I am totally loved.
I will just be ME!

If I forgive my past with the Love of God
And place my future in the hands of God,
I will be innocent, trusting, faithful, honest, patient, generous, compassionate, defenseless, gentle, open and joyful.

What more could I want?”

Trusting God and Good in All that Is,” Betty Lue

What more, indeed?  In my prayer practice, I affirm that I DO the first three questions: I really place my future in God’s hands; I really trust I Am provided for perfectly, and I really have faith that all things work together for good. I have enough life history behind me to know the Truth of these things in my life, so I don’t have to guess anymore.

When I recite the “I will” affirmations, all of them, I change them to the present tense for me and I say them aloud:  “I DO NOT worry….I AM NOT afraid….I LIVE…I ENJOY……I STOP…..and one of the one I say loudest of all is:

I PLAY and CREATE GOODNESS.

That’s a resolution of life for me. Thank you, Betty Lue.

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Gentle Woman Reiki

Today’s post is a repost of a blog I wrote a couple of years ago. Today, I continue this practice and continue to give Reiki treatments to those who desire them and Reiki attunements to those who wish to add Reiki practice and healing to their lives.

An ongoing update of the blessings of Reiki in my own family life. Many, with medical comments of the belief that Reiki is, in part, and sometimes wholly attributed to the healings experienced. I always treat Tom and he has recovered remarkedly from back pain over the past two years. He had a spinal fusion surgery and a fast recovery as he rehabbed with no further problems and the ability to walk distances with no pain. The previous ten years had been agony.

His skin cancers, especially around his face and scalp, have continued to be challenging, but right along with frequent Reiki treatments, he found excellent care at University of Michigan Cancer Clinic. This past year, he’s had over a half-dozen MOHS surgical procedures and the main doctor on the case said to us, “You are a good healer, in fact, you are the best healer I’ve seen with the amount of recovery you had to do.”  He definitely acknowledged Tom’s role in choosing healthy recovery and encouraged us to  continue the “Raykee” or whatever it was he was doing!

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Her ways are ways of gentleness and all her paths are peace.”
Proverbs

As a Usui Reiki Master, I give and teach a natural healing method you can do for yourself anytime, anywhere. It comes from the Japanese spiritual and holistic healing tradition and has been practiced in Japan and the United States and around the world since the early 1900s.  The tradition, for a long time, was passed on to another verbally and Reiki practitioners receive “attunements” into Level I, II, or Reiki Master & Master Teacher from another Master who comes from the line of Mikeo Usui, the founder of the healing practice.

One can learn much today from books and the internet about Reiki, but the passing on of the Reiki Universal Life Force powers of healing comes from the hand of another Reiki Master.

Beside the universal desire for love, the two other things I’ve wanted in life were good health and personal, all-abiding peace within. In my search for these, I walked many paths, dipped into many wells of knowledge and wisdom and I’ve had a wide variety of experiences that brought either suffering or healing.

And I guess I would add balance to my life-long “wanted” list for happiness. This explains the draw of Reiki into my life. If Reiki is about one thing- it is most certainly about balancing the body/mind/spirit for the highest good. That includes balancing your physiology and this impacts how you experience your life positively.

When I give a Reiki treatment to a person (hands above or gently on a fully-clothed person), two experiences are common and shared by anyone I treat.  First, they experience an intense heat penetrating where ever my hands are placed above or on them; second, they go into a deep relaxation — deeper than shivasana, experienced at the end of a yoga session.

As a Reiki practitioner, I am doing nothing but acting as a vessel for the Universal Life Force to do its healing of the person on whatever level they need it; spiritual, emotional, physical. The person in deep relaxation is actually drawing the Reiki healing power into their being, I am not “sending” it.

When, as a Reiki Master, I give a Level I attunement, to another person, they now have the Reiki Power, to self-treat or treat others in their presence; Level II, is a higher attunement for Distance Healing and like “Prayer Sent” the energy of Reiki can be sent out over the world for the healing of persons or the planet. A person requesting Master Attunement experiences Reiki as a Calling, and wants to bring more Reiki into the world throught treatments and attuning new practitioners.

Like the popular phrase in the Star War Series, “The Force is with you,” you can be sure It truly is — Reiki just plugs it in and lights it up!

Reiki has gone to bat for me in the healing of emotional disturbance, soulful direction and on the physical plane where you can see it: heart surgery and not only the healing but the disappearance of a brain tumor without surgery and about 1/4 of the drugs they originally ordered.

Cats love Reiki! I’ve had them dash out from hiding and come lay under my Reiki table when I am giving another person a treatment. They stretch out long and expose their belly (the cats). If I put my Reiki hands on their furry belly, I’m afraid they are going to break their purring machine!

Reiki helps me stay rooted just in today. It reminds me by its principles to strive for and surrender to kindness and honesty, to let go of stress and worry, and to be mindful of my blessings.

When I am out of balance and not able to relax or respond to others in kindness, I suffer. I don’t like to suffer. When I include a self-treatment of Reiki for myself in my morning spiritual practice, my day goes better me and for others I come in contact with.

Reiki is one of the wondrous practices that came to me as one of the results of my search for good health, happiness and a support of my spirituality. Reiki is here to be shared.

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